Fretwork | Why do textile fibres burn?
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Why do textile fibres burn?

Why do textile fibres burn?

Why do textile fibres burn?

Textile fibres comprise long chain molecules aligned with each other. Each type of textile fibre will have its own characteristics and these will determine how it behaves as a textile. The properties of a fibre that makes good textiles are, however, related to their ability to burn, starting with the fact that we all use them in every part of our lives. Properties such as comfort and warmth in a cold climate are as critical as cool and light properties in a hot climate. These properties derive from the amount of air surrounding each fibre and that is related to their ease of ignition. For this reason the ability to reduce the ignitability of textiles by applying flame retardants has been pursued as a worthwhile objective to improve safety where risk has identified this as necessary.

See Ease of IgnitionFire TriangleRate of spread of flame

Peter Wragg
pjw@fretwork.org.uk
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